Echoes in the press

A global alliance of civil society organisations (CSOs) and networks on 24 October presented a report assessing the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, as well as highlighting some of the structural obstacles and challenges to its achievement.

The CSOs that came together under the Reflection Group on the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development comprised the Arab NGO Network for Development (ANND), Development Alternatives with Women for a New Era (DAWN), Social Watch, Third World Network (TWN), and Global Policy Forum (GPF). They were supported by the Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung (FES).

When asked about how countries are implementing the 2030 Agenda and the obstacles encountered, civil society groups and coalitions affiliated with Social Watch around the world generally agree that their governments recognize the political weight of the new international consensus. Yet, many difficulties of different nature are identified in different countries, and a lot of them are related to finances.

“With reference to the 2030 Agenda, there are progress and setbacks,” writes Héctor Béjar on behalf of the Social Watch coalition in Peru. “GDP grew, but inequality grew as well. The mafias that exploit drug trafficking, illegal mining and smuggling continued to concentrate wealth, which then left the country through profits of foreign companies that enjoy lower taxes than national companies. Monetary poverty of less than USD 1.25 a day has declined, but multidimensional poverty has risen to critical levels. Maternal and infant mortality were reduced, but the anemia of women and children, unwanted and premature adolescent pregnancies and deaths from abortion and postpartum hemorrhage have remained.”

Photo: A girl makes her way home
after fetching water at a coastal
village in Tacloban, Leyte province.
Photograph: Ezra Acayan/NurPhoto
/Rex

Three years after the typhoon destroyed more than a million homes and killed 6,000 people, the Philippines has fallen far short on house-building pledge.

When Typhoon Haiyan smashed into the city of Tacloban in the central Philippines almost three years ago, Arsenio was one of the lucky ones – he survived by swimming a kilometre to safety. “Every time there is a storm, I get scared, even after three years,” he said. “I don’t want to go through the same thing again.”

Three years after the typhoon destroyed more than a million homes and killed 6,000 people, the Philippines has fallen far short on house-building pledge.

Arab NGO Network for Development (ANND) held a seminar to discuss issues related to Business and Human Rights in the context of the Pilot Project for the Promotion of Social Dialogue in the Southern Mediterranean Region. 

CESR Executive Director Ignacio
Saiz speaks at the side event
on July 12

Inequality has been center stage at the United Nations headquarters in recent days, as government officials, development experts and civil society representatives gathered for the first meeting of the High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development (HLPF) since the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) were agreed. 

The HLPF is the main platform for the follow-up and review of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The theme of this year’s HLPF – and one of the most potentially transformative elements of the Agenda – is the critical commitment to “leave no one behind.”

MUCH is made of the public-private partnership (PPP). This is where the public and private sectors combine to produce outcomes which are favorable to the nation. In practice, this has meant Luzon-based transportation infrastructure projects. Visayas and Mindanao have been largely left out. President Duterte will change this. Which is partly why a whopping 62 percent of Mindanaoans voted for him. In a presidential contest where there were four highly supported candidates, this is a remarkable mandate.

In New York heeft een topontmoeting plaats over de duurzame ontwikkelingsdoelstellingen, beter gekend als de Sustainable Development Goals (SDG’s). Op dit zgn High Level Political Forum (HLPF) wordt een eerste stand van zaken opgemaakt over hoe landen zich inzetten voor een betere wereld tegen 2030.

 “No dejar a nadie atrás” pasó a ser el lema de los Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible (ODS) de la ONU, pero queda mucho por hacer para llegar a concretarlo, coincidieron esta semana organizaciones de la sociedad civil en una conferencia de revisión de los avances de la Agenda de Desarrollo Posterior a 2015.

A diferencia de los los Objetivos de Desarrollo del Milenio de la ONU (Organización de las Naciones Unidas), que no lograron atender la desigualdad estructural, la sostenibilidad ecológica y las responsabilidades del Norte global, la Agenda 2030 para el Desarrollo Sostenible reconoce “la enorme disparidad de oportunidades, de riqueza y de poder” como inmensos desafíos para lograr el desarrollo sostenible, una novedad en materia de documentos intergubernamentales.

En el primer año de los 15 de la Agenda para 2030 todavía deben verse los cambios en el camino hacia el desarrollo global, según el informe Spotlight on Sustainable Development 2016 (El foco en el desarrollo sostenible), publicado esta semana por el Grupo de Reflexión de la Sociedad Civil.

CIUDAD DE MÉXICO (apro).- Al favorecer los megaproyectos por encima de los derechos civiles, políticos, sociales, culturales y ambientales de la población mexicana, la reforma energética pone en peligro el cumplimiento de siete de los 17 Objetivos para el Desarrollo Sostenible (ODS), según la organización Social Watch.

Con estos objetivos, los países miembros de las Naciones Unidas aspiran a erradicar la pobreza, reducir las desigualdades, proteger la naturaleza y promover los derechos humanos en el mundo hacia el horizonte 2030.

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